25Apr2024
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Category: Volunteering

CPHS Posts-26blog
Volunteering

Volunteers are vital to the success of our organization, and we are grateful for the hundreds of hours our volunteers dedicate to the work of the Canadian Pride Historical Society. This volunteer spotlight is for Brianne Fox, one of our amazing Board Members based out of Vancouver, BC. Read more about Brianne’s volunteer experience below. 

How did you first learn about the CPHS? 

I first learned about the CPHS when my spouse, who works in the non-profit sector. I had recently expressed an interest in increasing my volunteer activity and when she saw this opportunity come across her desk she passed it along to me. And being a huge history nerd, I thought it would be a great fit.  

What are 3 words to describe the CPHS? 

Inclusive, engaged, determined 

What do you find the most challenging at the CPHS? 

With the many exciting projects we have on the go and different areas of GSRD history to explore, it can be difficult to focus on a single initiative. Our history is so compelling but largely unexplored in the Canadian context. So while it is a challenge, we also have a great opportunity to get this great information in front of more people.  

What do you like the most about the CPHS? 

I’ve really enjoyed the opportunity to work with and learned from such a diverse group of individuals across our country. It is easy to become engrossed in local events, but the national scope of the CPHS provides an interesting perspective to GSRD issues and history.  

What drew you to the CPHS originally? How has the CPHS changed since you’ve joined? 

I was first drawn to the CPHS by the interesting mandate of documenting GRSD history from a Canadian perspective and providing educational resources to help others become more informed. Although our GSRD history may have similarities to the United States or European nations, our unique struggles and triumphs deserve their own spotlight. 

March 5 Post – Copy
Volunteering

Volunteers are vital to the success of our organization, and we are grateful for the hundreds of hours our volunteers dedicate to the work of the Canadian Pride Historical Society. This volunteer spotlight is for Hana Acorn, one of our amazing Research Coordinators. Read more about Hana’s volunteer experience below.  

How did you first learn about the CPHS? 

I took the the Social and Civic Opportunities: Pathways to Equity (SCOPE) program at MOSAIC, the NPO that supports newcomers in Metro Vancouver, since I wanted to learn about Canadian social systems. It all started when I learned through the SCOPE session that CPHS was looking for research coordinators.

How has the CPHS helped you in your professional development? 

I was a non-fiction writer in my country of origin and had written a few books on LGBTQ+ rights and advocacy. However, it is a very developing country when it comes to human rights despite my native land being an economic powerhouse. That country is also more than 20 years behind Canada when it comes to LGBTQ+ rights. Therefore, I realized that the knowledge I had was completely inadequate after I came to Canada and that I needed to learn more here. I am able to learn more deeply about Canadian Pride History by being involved in CPHS research work. 

What do you find the most challenging at the CPHS? 

I’ve only been in Canada for two and a half years, so I have very little idea where the municipalities I’m researching are or what kind of cities and towns they are. Thus, I always have to look at maps and something like Wikipedia to get information about the municipalities. 

What do you like the most about the CPHS? 

All work is done online, so being able to volunteer from home is convenient and connect with peers across Canada from the comfort of my own home.

What has been your favourite project at the CPHS? 

I also had some careers related to education, so it is attractive that there are abundant educational resources. I hope to translate these materials into my first language someday. 

 What are 3 words to describe the CPHS? 

Challenge, Discover, Expand 

Jan 10 Blog
Volunteering

Volunteers are vital to the success of our organization, and we are grateful for the hundreds of hours our volunteers dedicate to the work of the Canadian Pride Historical Society. This volunteer spotlight is for Kaiden Reding, one of our amazing Research Coordinators based out of Calgary, AB. Read more about Kaiden’s volunteer experience below!

How did you first learn about the CPHS? 

I came across the CPHS when I was a graduate student in Public History, looking for a way to give back to my community that I could balance with my job and studies. I ended up finding the position of Research Coordinator which perfectly fit the bill! 

How has the CPHS helped you in your professional development? 

My time at the CPHS has helped me to develop my abilities as a researcher and become more familiar with the different archival repositories across Canada, both of which have been beneficial for my work in the museum sector as a curator and interpreter. I was also able to use some of what I’ve learned during my master’s program and to later find new job opportunities. 

What do you find the most challenging at the CPHS? 

Sometimes the research can be quite emotionally difficult – not only in terms of the content but also the gaps in that content. It’s sad to see how much information and knowledge has been lost in such a short amount of time, particularly outside of major cities, but it’s encouraging that these preservation efforts are underway and I’m glad to be a part of them. 

What do you like the most about the CPHS? 

It’s a very supportive, respectful, and collaborative environment where it feels like the whole team is on equal footing and each person’s unique experiences and knowledge are valued. There’s also a lot of flexibility for different styles of working, and it’s easy to communicate with other team members to offer feedback or work through any problems that come up. I also appreciate how the CPHS takes an intersectional approach to historical research and supports accessibility in its many forms. 

Illustrations_4
Education ProjectResearch ProjectVolunteering

As 2023 comes to a close, we’d like to acknowledge our achievements this past year. It was a busy year for the Canadian Pride Historical Society with many milestones achieved and foundations laid for our continuous progress on our Pride History Research and Education Projects. Thanks to our dedicated volunteers we have much to celebrate as we go into 2024.  

 Here are some of the things we are most proud of this year: 

  • Launched our Alberta Research and Education Materials 
  • Marched in the Calgary Pride and Pride Winnipeg Parades for the second year 
  • Held our first Drag Storytime event during Calgary Pride
  • Launched our #CapturePrideHistory campaign to build our Pride Photo Database 
  • Released the first installment of our Pride History Wiki 
  • Grew our volunteer base from 41 to 53 
  • Provided workshops at the National Gathering of Indigenous Education and to the Disability Foundation 
  • Created Drag lesson plans for different age groups 
  • Introduced our CPHS Heritage Minutes YouTube series 
  • Held our very first Canadian Pride History Trivia Night 
Volunteer spotlight – POST
Volunteering

Volunteers are vital to the success of our organization and we are grateful for the hundreds of hours our volunteers dedicate to the work of the Canadian Pride Historical Society. This volunteer spotlight is for Shogo Hosoi, one of our Human Resources Coordinators, based out of Tokyo!

How did you first learn about the CPHS? 
I came across a volunteer posting for an HR administrator on Charity Village when I was looking for an opportunity related to my field of study: Human Resource Management. Having volunteered for Pride Toronto in 2022, I was fascinated by the culture of Pride and its integration into the community. From that perspective, I thought that CPHS was the perfect place to volunteer for. 

How do you balance your volunteer time at the CPHS with your other competing priorities? 
I make time for volunteering in the evenings. In addition to my full-time job, I also look after my three-year-old daughter. There is usually a lot on my plate. 

However, having great support from my team makes my tasks clear, which helps me make the most of my limited time. 

How has the CPHS helped you in your professional development?
After completing my Masters at the University of Toronto, I returned to Japan, my home country. Being associated with CPHS helps me to build a bond with my second home, while being involved in the whole process of recruitment, selection and onboarding gives me the opportunity to reflect on and apply my studies in HR. 

What are 3 words to describe the CPHS? 
Inclusive, supportive, meaningful 

What do you like the most about the CPHS? 
I appreciate the generous support and care of my team. Knowing my interest in DEI, my manager provides information on valuable resources and ongoing projects related to the field. I feel that CPHS values and respects each individual in the organisation. 

Aug22_Post
Volunteering

Volunteers are vital to the success of our organization, and we are grateful for the hundreds of hours our volunteers dedicate to the work of the Canadian Pride Historical Society. This volunteer spotlight is for Erica Ngaii, one of our Research Coordinators, based out of Toronto, ON. Read more below. 

Before volunteering at the CPHS, what was the most unusual or interesting volunteer job you’ve ever had?  
I had the most unforgettable volunteer experience as a humanitarian worker in Chihuahua, Mexico for one year. It is a life-changing experience that has played a pivotal role in shaping who I am today.  

How has the CPHS helped you in your professional development?  
The CPHS has enhanced my skills in effectively locating and utilizing grey literature to address research questions. Through the research tasks I have undertaken at the CPHS, I have gained valuable practical experience in identifying and accessing diverse non-traditional information sources, which is valuable for my research endeavors.  

What are 3 words to describe the CPHS?   
Diverse, curious, aspirational  

How do you balance your volunteer time at the CPHS with your other competing priorities?  
I prioritize my tasks in advance and dedicate regular time specifically to CPHS research. The CPHS team has been accommodating and understanding, allowing flexibility when needed. 

 

 

Thinking of volunteering? Check out our latest volunteer postings HERE.

July 12_Post
Volunteering

Volunteers are vital to the success of our organization, and we are grateful for the hundreds of hours our volunteers dedicate to the work of the Canadian Pride Historical Society. This volunteer spotlight is for Lexie Milmine, one of our Senior Research Coordinators, based out of Hamilton, ON. Read more below. 

How did you first learn about the CPHS? 

I found out about CPHS when I was looking for opportunities to learn about the non-profit sector and gain experience related to my field of study. I came across a volunteer posting for a Research Coordinator on Charity Village and was excited to have found just the kind of role was hoping for — flexible volunteer work in a GSRD/2SLGBTQIA+-focused organization. 

How do you balance your volunteer time at the CPHS with your other competing priorities? 

It’s super helpful for me that my role with CPHS compliments what I do outside of volunteering. I’m a PhD Candidate conducting research in the sociology of sexuality and gender and I hope to continue researching in non-profit settings when I graduate. My Sr. Research Coordinator tasks allow me to practice skills that help me in my studies, like critical thinking and knowledge translation, and help me learn more about queer histories, communities, and organizing in Canada. It’s also a way to bridge my skillset with my lived experience as a queer person to contribute to queer communities across Canada. 

What do you like the most about the CPHS? 

I really appreciate that CPHS approaches research, education, and organizational operations through an intersectional lens. Queer history in Canada is undeniably intertwined with the histories of other equity-seeking communities, and our oppressions and triumphs are connected in complex ways. CPHS volunteers recognize this and continually look for ways to centre voices that are often dismissed, valuing multiple forms of knowledge and lived experience, and working to produce resources that reflect the diversity of Canada’s queer communities. 

What advice do you have for prospective volunteers for the CPHS? 

We’re fortunate to be able to connect with fellow volunteers from across the country, and this comes with the flexibility to manage your own time, but can leave you feeling a little lost or disconnected when starting a new role. My advice is to be open to asking for help and direction. It can feel uncomfortable to ask questions or admit you’re unsure, but reaching out can help you feel more confident in your role and has the bonus benefit of helping you connect with other team members. We work in teams for a reason, so know that your team members are available over email or teams to help if you’re feeling lost, have questions, or need more guidance. 

What are 3 words to describe the CPHS? 

Growing, intersectional, honouring. 

Allison
Volunteering

Volunteers are vital to the success of our organization, and we are grateful for the hundreds of hours our volunteers dedicate to the work of the Canadian Pride Historical Society. This volunteer spotlight is for Allison Vickery, our Vice-President, Communications and Marketing based out of Calgary, AB. Read more below.  

Before volunteering at the CPHS, what was the most unusual or interesting volunteer job you’ve ever had? 
I worked for an organization in Peru where I was able to find local non-profits and other organizations that I was passionate about and arrange for the provision of volunteers and resources. It was extremely gratifying to be able to make a direct difference for so many causes and people that I care about. Through this role I also had the opportunity to train and mentor hundreds of volunteers whose passion about their respective volunteer placements was inspiring.  

How has the CPHS helped you in your professional development? 
The environment is incredibly supportive which has allowed me take on new challenges while also feeling encouraged and guided along the way. I’ve acquired new skills and gained confidence in the ones I had prior. It has also granted me the ability to network with exceptionally talented volunteers from across the country.  

What advice do you have for prospective volunteers for the CPHS? 
My advice is to come share your talent with us! This is a great opportunity for you to shine in your area or get exposure to an area you are interested in. Task assignment is tailored to ensure that no one ever feels overwhelmed or alone with what they are working on. Nothing beats knowing you are using some of your spare time to help make a difference. 

What is your proudest moment at the CPHS? 
Thanks to the amazing volunteers who assist me with social media graphics and content, we have grown our following exponentially over the past year! Due to their hard work and talent, we can continue to share our free materials, spread our message, and promote an understanding of why Pride is so important to all of us.  

paola
Volunteering

Volunteers are vital to the success of our organization, and we are grateful for the hundreds of hours our volunteers dedicate to the work of the Canadian Pride Historical Society. This volunteer spotlight is for Paola Valadez, one of our Graphic Design Coordinators based out of Vancouver, BC. Read more below. 

How do you balance your volunteer time at the CPHS with your other competing priorities? 

As being a part of CPHS is also a priority in my professional life, I reserved one day during the weekend so that it can’t be affected by my work, and I focused on getting everything done. 

What do you like the most about the CPHS? 

Every day I can learn something new, making me understand and feel proud of every human in the world without judgment. 

What has been your favourite project at the CPHS? 

Every project has something special, but if I had to choose one, the design of the graphics for the Winnipeg Pride Parade. I am proud to “help” thousands of people throughout the design to spread a message. 

What are 3 words to describe the CPHS? 

love, pride, history

sofia
Volunteering

Volunteers are vital to the success of our organization, and we are grateful for the hundreds of hours our volunteers dedicate to the work of the Canadian Pride Historical Society. This volunteer spotlight is for Sofia Arora, our Recruitment Coordinator based out of Markham, Ontario, read more below. 

Before volunteering at the CPHS, what was the most unusual or interesting volunteer job you’ve ever had? 
It was with Red Cross, in their Friendly Calling Program where I got a chance to provide supportive listening, social interaction, and emotional support to the call recipients to help them reduce anxiety, depression, or loneliness. 

How did you first learn about the CPHS? 
I learned about the opportunity through Charity Village 

How do you balance your volunteer time at the CPHS with your other competing priorities? 
It’s indeed challenging but the flexibility that CPHS provides me helps a lot to balance out my workload. Besides, I do feel very supported by the team which makes my work easier.  Normally, I keep aside a few hours during weekdays in my schedule to work. 

How has the CPHS helped you in your professional development? 
CPHS has helped me in building on leadership skills, by giving me a chance to coach and manage another team member.  

Also, I hold a Certified Human Resources Professional CHRP designation, and in order to maintain that I have to complete my Continued Professional Development hours. The time I volunteer with CPHS helps me in achieving a part of it. 

What drew you to the CPHS originally? How has the CPHS changed since you joined? 
It’s the mission, I am closely working with the folks from the QTBIPOC and LGBT community in my full-time job, and working with CPHS gave me a chance to learn more about Pride’s History and community better.   

In terms of change, I have seen that different roles have been elevated by delegating decision-making power, and processes are being more streamlined using technology.  

What are 3 words to describe the CPHS? 
Inclusive, Collaborative, Purposeful 

What do you like the most about the CPHS? 
Flexibility and management support.  

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